Is There a ‘Right’ Way to Write Fiction?

They say not to judge a book by its cover, but I did that when I saw this book.

On Sunday, I wrote a little post about a thriller novel I recently read, Rules of Vengeance. Reading that book made me think about other thriller novels I’ve read, specifically those by Daniel Silva. He is another one of my favorite authors and I got started reading his Gabriel Allon series when I saw Moscow Rules in the bookstore.

In general, Silva’s novels follow one specific character, Gabriel Allon. The story is told from a third-person omniscient point of view and solely focuses on Gabriel (though sometimes with the exception of a prologue that involves completely different people that will later become relevant to the story). However, though Christopher Reich wrote Rules of Vengeance from an omniscient third-person point of view, he jumped around quite a bit and did not always focus the story on the protagonist.

My question is whether one way is preferable to the other. I am writing a thriller novel (it has undergone many transformations over the years) and I originally intended to focus on a group of characters. As I started writing, though, a certain character began to take over (he wasn’t even supposed to be the protagonist!) and now I am strongly considering narrowing my focus so that the story is about him. I am not sure what to do – and I am not sure that there really even is a right or wrong answer.

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4 thoughts on “Is There a ‘Right’ Way to Write Fiction?

  1. Dear Natalie,

    wow, congratulations on endeavouring into writing a thriller 🙂 Kudos!

    I’m not an expert in that field, but maybe it would be a sound decision to let your characters lead you 🙂 They already seem to be doing that and perhaps they’re guiding you to the right direction…

    Good luck,
    Katarina

    1. Yep, I’ve found that my characters can be quite strong-willed. Even though I have a plan for the book, I’m actually not entirely sure how it’s going to turn out. 🙂

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