Discombobulated, Again

Remember how I forgot to blog a little while ago? Well, I didn’t forget to blog last week—I just got all thrown off a little (okay, a lot) due to an unpleasant and unexpected event.

Last Monday a vicious storm sprung up out of nowhere and pounded the area I live in. At work, we got a little thunder and lightning and not much rain, but at home, there was wind galore. That meant downed trees and power lines, which obviously means no electricity. We’ve had a few power outages this year. The prior two were annoying, but the power came back on within four hours. This latest one was different. It took a good seven hours for it to come back on, so that meant the demise of the delicious homemade soup I’d made the night before (and had only eaten once). Basically, that threw me off all of last week. I don’t think anyone was expecting that.

So, rest assured, I am here and planning to schedule some posts. I don’t want to have yet another week without much blogging! This evening I’ll be working on writing of different kinds, which will include blog posts and fiction writing.

Also of note is the fact that I played my violin today. Hallelujah! I haven’t played in a while and it was good to play again. Unfortunately, my fingers became weak and uncalloused, so right now they’re a bit sensitive. 🎻

99 Years / 99 лет

The tsar with his family / Царь с семьей

Dear readers! 99 years ago today, Nicholas II, Emperor of all the Russias, along with his family and faithful servants, was cruelly murdered by the Bolsheviks. Let us take a moment to remember the last tsar.

Дорогие читатели! В этот день 99 лет назад, жестко убили императора Всероссийского Николая II с семьей и верными слугами большевиками. Давайте запомним последнего царя.

Вечная память.

I forgot to blog.

Yes, dear readers, it’s true. For the past nine days, I completely forgot to write blog posts! I’ve been busy with stuff at work and recovering data from a computer hard drive at home. Moral of the story: you can never, ever, ever make too many backups of your data. My theory is this: if it doesn’t exist in at least three places, it doesn’t exist at all. 🙂

This week is going to be busy, too. I have a lot of stuff to do at work and I’ve been working hard on my novel after work. So far I’ve maintained a daily average of over a thousand words, which is the most I’ve ever done! (Except when I did NaNoWriMo, because to win that you have to average 1,667 words per day.) But hopefully I will not forget to blog this week.

Also, can we just ban Mondays? I really think Monday should be an extension of the weekend and we should work four days a week. Who decided to work five days a week anyway?!

June 2017 Writing Report

I don’t actually write with quills, thank goodness!

You guys, June was a really good month for writing. I got off to a bit of a rocky start because of the certification exam, but then I really took off and it was great. I’m really happy about this. I wrote a total of 19,918 words in June, which is an average of 663 words per day. That’s almost to my goal of 700 per day that I set for this year. I missed only 13 days of writing, which isn’t too bad. What really pushed me over the edge were a couple of 3,000 word days I had in there. Seriously, 3,000 words is a really good word count (for me) and I’m pleased I was able to do that twice. (Just so you know, I’ve already done it once in July, too!)

Oh, and I finished a draft of my science fiction book. This book has had many plot and character changes, so I think this was draft #4. I haven’t read over it yet and I’m sure it needs editing, but I really hope it doesn’t need another rewrite because a fifth rewrite sounds a bit ridiculous, even to me.

How’s your writing going?

Wednesday Music: Vivaldi’s ‘Summer’ From ‘The Four Seasons’ [Repost]

I’ve posted this piece before, but I thought I’d do a repost since the first day of summer was… somewhat recently. Here’s a bit about Antonio Vivaldi’s Concerto No. 2 in G minor, Op. 8, RV 315, L’estate (Summer).

  • This piece is one of four violin concerti that make up Vivaldi’s group of compositions collectively called The Four Seasons (Le quattro stagioni for you Italian speakers out there!). Each one is meant to evoke one of the four seasons. They were published in 1725.
  • In addition to music, there are also accompany sonnets to go with each piece. This means they are called program music.
  • In addition to the sonnets, Vivaldi has instructions in the music. The instructions for summer include “Languor caused by the heat.” I guess it’s safe to assume that Italy gets hot in the summer!

Enjoy!

Or click here to see on YouTube.

Happy Independence Day!

I like the vintage look of this photo.

Now it catches the gleam of the morning’s first beam,
In full glory reflected now shines in the stream:
‘Tis the star-spangled banner, O long may it wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

–From the second verse of Francis Scott Key’s poem The Star-Spangled Banner. This poem is our national anthem, though usually only the first verse is sung.

Happy Fourth of July, fellow Americans! Today we celebrate our birth as a nation. Even though I didn’t do anything in particular to celebrate today—aside from not working and listening to our national anthem—this is the best Fourth of July in a long time.

Happy Independence Day and may we have many, many more!

Wednesday Music: Khachaturian’s Waltz from ‘Masquerade’

You guys, I discovered this piece recently and immediately loved it, so obviously I said to myself that I just had to share it with my blog readers. The piece in question is the Waltz from Aram Khachaturian’s Masquerade. I’d never heard about it until a couple of weeks ago, so all the facts I researched were new to me, too. Here’s a bit about it.

  • This piece is a bit—okay, a lot—more modern than what I usually post since it was written in 1941. By my standards of posting pieces from the eighteenth or early nineteenth centuries, that’s practically yesterday! 😉
  • Khachaturian wrote this as incidental music for a production of a play in the USSR. The play was also called Masquerade and was written by Mikhail Lermontov, one of my favorite authors. (He wrote the excellent novel A Hero of Our Time, which I greatly enjoyed.)
  • Later on, Khachaturian extended the music he wrote into five movements to make a symphonic suite. What I’m posting is just the first movement of the suite, the waltz.

Enjoy!

Or click here to see on YouTube.