A Cute Bird

One of the local library branches near where I live has parakeets. Yes, you read that right. There are actual parakeets at this library and they are adorable. They live in a cage in the children’s section and surprisingly enough, the kids seem to behave around them. The librarians help keep an eye on them, from what I’ve seen.

One of the birds is so adorable that I had to take a few pictures of him. He chirped the entire time.

Isn't he cute?
Isn’t he cute?

One of the many reasons why I always go to this branch is so I can see this little guy. Seriously, if the librarians didn’t keep such a close watch on him, I’d be tempted to slip him into my pocket and take him home with me! Too bad I need to get some writing done today—otherwise I’d go visit him later!

Words Of Wisdom From The Admiral

No Wednesday Music today, dear readers. I couldn’t find/decide on a piece! But I did write a post, so at least that.

Regular readers may know that I’m a huge admirer of Alexander Kolchak, a Russian admiral who served in the Imperial Russian Navy and later became famous as a noted military and political leader for the White Movement during the Russian Civil War. I’ve been fascinated by him since I saw a Russian film called Admiral back in 2008. (Just so you know, the TV series is way better, but unfortunately not available with English subtitles.)

Anyway, about a week ago, I wasn’t having such a great day at work. Everyone kept giving me stuff to do (and of course wanted it done yesterday, i.e. the day before they gave it to me), I was worried about not being able to finish, and it was very frustrating. I opened up Twitter and, lo and behold, what did I see? A quote from Admiral Kolchak! I follow a pro-White Movement Twitter account (actually, I follow several, because that is the depth of my obsession) and someone tweeted this nice photo. It certainly won’t win any awards for graphic design, I’ll give you that, but it really made my day.

Click to see larger
Нет поражений. Есть временные трудности. -А.В. Колчак

In English, the quote is: “There are no defeats—only temporary obstacles.” Or at least that’s how I’ve translated it. There seem to be a surprising amount of shades of meaning of the word поражение [porazhenie].

Now, I realize there’s a certain bit of irony in quoting a man who was betrayed by troops who were supposed to be on his side, which led to him being handed over to his enemies, interrogated/tried by a kangaroo court, and murdered at the conclusion of this “trial.” (Kolchak’s murder took place ninety-seven years ago as of yesterday, February 7. Maybe that’s why I’ve been reflecting on this recently…) I’m not really sure what to call that other than a defeat. But hey, I think it’s an inspiring quote and I’m rather partial to anything Kolchak-related.

A lot of people at work have quotes on little pieces of paper pinned up at their desks. Most people have random inspirational stuff or favorite Bible verses. I may have to put this one up. Now that will garner some inquiries from my team, I’m sure!

P.S. Here’s how the tweet looked when it showed up in my Twitter stream. It made me so happy that I had to take a screenshot.

Yes, my phone is in Russian!
Yes, my phone is in Russian!

P.P.S. I researched this quote and to be honest, it’s quite hard to find a substantiated source for it. In my research, I found this slightly more wordier version: Не может быть поражений — могут быть лишь временные трудности. It pretty much amounts to the same thing in English, though. Despite the unsubstantiation (is that even a word?), I like it and am going to resolutely believe it is true unless I find out otherwise.

January Writing Report

Obligatory writing instrument.
Obligatory writing instrument.

Welcome to the January Writing Report, dear readers! I’m quite pleased with how things turned out this past month. I wrote a total of 23,322 words during the month of January, which works out to an average of 752 words per day. Considering that my goal is to average 700 words per day this year, I’m very pleased. I’m actually surprised I did that well because I missed 13 days of writing. I don’t feel too bad about that because most of those days were right before I took my certification exam, which I passed.

I worked on two projects in January: my novel that is turning out to be epically long (which never happens to me, so maybe this is a good thing) and an outline for my next book series. Hopefully these books will garner me a book deal one of these days. 🙂 I read somewhere that fantasy author Brandon Sanderson wrote thirteen books before he sold any work. (And they didn’t even buy the thirteenth book first. They bought the sixth, which is super random.) I do hope to send out some queries this year, but only if I have a completed and edited manuscript. And yes, I know that I could, in theory, devote more time to the current manuscript if I weren’t outlining at the same time. I actually think this dual method is helping me, though. Sometimes I don’t have the mental energy to write more than a certain number of words for a project, but I still have energy to write. Channeling this energy into a different project has been working out well. I’m not sure I could juggle more than two projects, but two seems to be a good number.

Wednesday Music: Mozart’s Horn Concerto No. 3

I almost didn’t write a post in time for Wednesday Music this week because I had trouble choosing something. I knew I wanted to have Mozart because last Friday, January 27 was his birthday (so I should have had Mozart last week, but I didn’t realize it was his birthday until the day of), but I couldn’t decide what Mozart piece to post. Then I remembered his horn concerti. I love them all but strangely enough, I haven’t posted any of them. So today’s piece is his Horn Concerto No. 3 in E-flat major, K. 447. Here’s a bit about it.

  • Mozart completed it between 1784 and 1787 when he was living in Vienna.
  • He wrote it for his friend Joseph Leutgeb, an accomplished hornist and friend. The score is currently stored at the British Library in London.
  • The work is in three movements and is scored for two clarinets, two bassoons, solo horn, and strings.

Enjoy! The second movement is a particular favorite of mine, so be sure to listen to that (it starts at 7:06). This is an old recording, so the quality isn’t the best, but it’s hard to find a decent one on YouTube!

Or click here to listen on YouTube.

Look What Arrived In The Mail…

Dear readers, look what arrived in the mail for me last week.

From Russia with love
From Russia with love

In English, the title is Kolchak: Supreme Leader of Russia by Pavel Ziryanov. Yes, I ordered this online and about a week later, it arrived. It actually didn’t come directly from Russia. The seller I bought it from is based in New York. I read parts of this book when I was in graduate school and had access to an excellent collection of Russian-language books at the university library. I meant to buy it but forgot until recently. Luckily, I found it online, impulsively ordered it, and here it is.

And seriously, I got it for an excellent price. Only $19.00, including shipping. I found this exact book on a Russian website and even with the exchange rate that’s favorable to America right now, it was more expensive. Plus it would have taken forever to get here and the shipping was more expensive, as the site ships internationally with a private carrier. (Because, trust me, you don’t want to entrust the Russian postal service with anything of vital importance.)

Wanted: Blog Recommendations

Hear ye, hear ye, dear readers. I have a request for all of you. In short, I need recommendations of good blogs to read. My reading list has been a bit sparse recently. The bloggers I read now don’t blog every day, so there are some days when zero posts show up in my reader.

I used to read a lot more blogs, but slowly I pruned my list. It wasn’t because I had too many on the list; it was because I didn’t enjoy reading those blogs anymore. For example, I stopped reading Joanna Penn’s The Creative Penn blog. I like Joanna and I think she’s a nice person. I read her blog for years. In fact, I started reading it when I was in college and only stopped reading it early this year or late last year (I can’t remember which). As I said, I don’t bear any ill will towards her. It’s just that as time went on, it changed from being less of a writing advice and writing craft blog to more of a “Look at me and my BRAND and my publishing and marketing strategies and yes, let’s talk about BRAND again.” Thanks, but no thanks.

Anyway, hers isn’t the only blog I’ve stopped reading. I dumped a lot of people from my reader. Therefore, my list is a bit thin. And that’s where you come in! Please, dear readers, give me some blog recommendations. I only read English and Russian, so I’d appreciate it if you limit it to those two languages. If you’re reading my blog, you probably know what my interests are, but just in case, here’s some things I like, in no particular order. (You don’t have to limit your recommendations to these, of course. It’s just a starting point.)

  • Russian history, language, and literature
  • History in general
  • Classical music, especially anything violin-related
  • Crafts, especially knitting and crocheting
  • Writing fiction
  • Reading books

Yep… that’s basically me in a nutshell. Bring on the recommendations! 🙂

Wednesday Music: Beethoven’s Wind Octet in E-Flat Major

I found this delightful piece—Beethoven’s Wind Octet in E-flat major, Op. 103—while looking for study music on YouTube. (Hey, I had to have something to listen to while going over all those study units for my recent exam.) I passed the exam, so maybe that means this piece is good luck? Who knows. 😀 Anyway, this piece is very beautiful and we haven’t had Beethoven in a while, so here’s a bit about it.

  • The piece is written for two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, and two horns. It has four movements.
  • Beethoven wrote it in 1792 while he was living in Bonn, prior to moving to Vienna. He later reworked and expanded it as his first String Quintet, Op. 4.
  • However, the Wind Octet wasn’t published until about ten years after his death (it was published in either 1834 or 1837; I found both dates while researching), hence its high opus number.

Enjoy!

Or click here to listen on YouTube.