June 2017 Writing Report

I don’t actually write with quills, thank goodness!

You guys, June was a really good month for writing. I got off to a bit of a rocky start because of the certification exam, but then I really took off and it was great. I’m really happy about this. I wrote a total of 19,918 words in June, which is an average of 663 words per day. That’s almost to my goal of 700 per day that I set for this year. I missed only 13 days of writing, which isn’t too bad. What really pushed me over the edge were a couple of 3,000 word days I had in there. Seriously, 3,000 words is a really good word count (for me) and I’m pleased I was able to do that twice. (Just so you know, I’ve already done it once in July, too!)

Oh, and I finished a draft of my science fiction book. This book has had many plot and character changes, so I think this was draft #4. I haven’t read over it yet and I’m sure it needs editing, but I really hope it doesn’t need another rewrite because a fifth rewrite sounds a bit ridiculous, even to me.

How’s your writing going?

May 2017 Writing Report

This is going to be a short post because the less that is said about the May writing report, the better.

In May, I wrote a total of 5,068 words, which is an average of 163 words per day. That’s a rather dismal figure, I’m afraid. I spent most of May studying for my exam, which I passed, so it was definitely worth it. But still, I wish I’d had more time for writing.

The good news is that as of right now, I’ve written more this month than I did the entire month of May. Surely that’s a good thing, right?

April 2017 Writing Report

Obligatory writing instrument.

In the interest of not having a writing report almost an entire month after the month in question has ended (I have no idea if that sentence makes sense, but it happened with the February writing report this year), I wanted to post the April writing report this evening. You know the routine, dear readers. Here we go…

In April, I wrote a total of 17,296 words. That’s an average of 576 words per day. Not my goal of 700 per day, but better than last month’s daily average. I only missed ten days of writing, which isn’t too bad. The bad thing is a lot of those were Fridays and Saturdays, which in theory should be the days when I have more time to write.

The thing is, I’ve been a bit exhausted this March and April. (You’ll recall I had a dismal writing month in March.) The problem is a certain project at work. It’s kind of dreadful. It would be dreadful in the best of circumstances, but the circumstances are nowhere close to being the best right now. There aren’t enough people working on said project and the manager isn’t doing a very good job of managing it. As you can probably guess, these circumstances are a recipe for disaster. It also doesn’t help that I have a professional certification exam I really need to study for but haven’t been studying for due to the dreadful project (and yes, writing takes away from my study time too, but a person’s got to have some way to de-stress outside of work, don’t you think?!).

Anyway, fingers crossed that things get better soon… Overall, I am pleased with my writing progress in April. Here’s to a successful month in May!

Inspiring Writing Links

I have a folder in my bookmarks called “Later” where I save things that I want to share with you on this blog. I’ve had these two links saved there for ages, so I am finally going to post them.

The first is called “Beginning to self-edit.” Writer Sherwood Smith talks about visiting a writing workshop run by a friend. The writers had all finished NaNoWriMo and were beginning to edit their novels. The advice in the whole post is interesting, but I saved the link to share this one bit:

The next couple of people’s suggestions were a bit more idiosyncratic: “Throw out the first three chapters of any first draft,” —great advice sometimes, but by no means universal, especially for writers who actually begin the story too late, and end up shoe-horning a ton of flashback into the front in order to orient the bewildered reader—and, “Make sure your ending closes the story suggested by the beginning.”

A lot of advice I’ve seen talks about starting the novel too early in the story, so it was gratifying to see Smith mention that it is also possible to start too late. I had that very problem—beginning my story too late—with the book I’m currently working on. In my case, I think I started it about twenty-five percent too late. The draft I’m currently working on starts a bit earlier. And while I do know the story still will need editing, I do think it’s stronger right now than it used to be.

The next link is the about page of fantasy author Brandon Sanderson. I’ve never read any of his work, but I have heard of him. What I didn’t know until recently was how much he wrote before he found a publisher. His website says he wrote seven novels as an undergraduate. I read somewhere else that he had thirteen complete by the time he sold his first book (which was the sixth or seventh book he wrote, if I remember correctly). I think the moral of the story here is that we writers just need to keep writing. I mean, thirteen novels is some real commitment. I’m impressed.

March 2017 Writing Report

The March writing report is rather dismal. Honestly, I kind of just want to skip it and forget that it happened. But in the interest of transparency, here it is.

I wrote a total of 12,642 words in March, which is an average of 408 per day. That’s dreadful because my goal for this year is 700 per day. I skipped writing on 18 days, which I think is a record for me this year! On the days I did write, I actually did quite well, so I think the problem was not enough writing. I can’t remember what I was doing instead of writing. It certainly wasn’t crocheting because I’m still working on my pink afghan, even though I wanted to be finished months ago!

So here’s to a better writing month in April. I’ve missed some days already, but that’s okay because we all need a break. I’m almost finished with my outline, which is great. I can’t wait to start writing my next book!

February 2017 Writing Report

Wow, this post is almost three weeks late! I meant to post earlier this month about my writing done in February, but I forgot. Better late than never, I guess.

In February, I wrote a total of 16,976 words. That number actually sort of bothers me because it’s just so close to 17,000. If only I’d written a bit on the last day of February, I could have had 17,000. That is an average of 606 words per day, which is a bit short of what I achieved back in January (752 words per day). My goal for this year is 700 per day, so I’ll have to step it up a bit in March. 🙂

Anyway, in February I missed writing on 13 days. Plus, it was a short month, so if we take those factors into account, that isn’t a bad word count at all.

I can’t believe March is almost over already. There isn’t much time left get some decent word counts in!

January Writing Report

Obligatory writing instrument.
Obligatory writing instrument.

Welcome to the January Writing Report, dear readers! I’m quite pleased with how things turned out this past month. I wrote a total of 23,322 words during the month of January, which works out to an average of 752 words per day. Considering that my goal is to average 700 words per day this year, I’m very pleased. I’m actually surprised I did that well because I missed 13 days of writing. I don’t feel too bad about that because most of those days were right before I took my certification exam, which I passed.

I worked on two projects in January: my novel that is turning out to be epically long (which never happens to me, so maybe this is a good thing) and an outline for my next book series. Hopefully these books will garner me a book deal one of these days. 🙂 I read somewhere that fantasy author Brandon Sanderson wrote thirteen books before he sold any work. (And they didn’t even buy the thirteenth book first. They bought the sixth, which is super random.) I do hope to send out some queries this year, but only if I have a completed and edited manuscript. And yes, I know that I could, in theory, devote more time to the current manuscript if I weren’t outlining at the same time. I actually think this dual method is helping me, though. Sometimes I don’t have the mental energy to write more than a certain number of words for a project, but I still have energy to write. Channeling this energy into a different project has been working out well. I’m not sure I could juggle more than two projects, but two seems to be a good number.